Coldplay Collaborative Poster Project

Here is another collaborative gig poster I did with Austin artist, Clint Wilson. This time we did a promo poster for a Coldplay performance in Houston at the Toyota Center, complete with free tickets to the show. It was amazing! They filmed the show for an upcoming movie. Everyone got bracelets that lit up with LED lights turning the amphitheater into a concave disco ball with the audience becoming part of the performance.

Glass tile prior to firing. Clint Wilson & Tessa Morrison. 2012.

For this project the idea was for Clint and I to combine two different art techniques to create the resulting poster. So we made a fused glass piece together, took a photo, turned it into half-tone color separations, and then printed a silk-screened poster.

Finished poster design. Clint Wilson & Tessa Morrison. 2012.

Below is a link to video of the whole process:

Coldplay Poster Time-Lapse

This was my first foray with half-tone color separations, I’ve mainly done single color screen printing, and Clint had never worked with fused glass before, so it was definitely a learning experience on both ends. So overall a successful collaboration.

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Clint Prints Logo Fused-Glass Piece

Here is a fused glass piece I made from “float” glass, a.k.a., your standard window glass. The technique used to create the squid involves kiln carving and glass glazes. It is the logo for local gig poster artist, Clint Wilson. I nicknamed the mascot “Squidly”, inspired I know. Unfortunately this adorable cephalopod broke clear in half, but I was able to fix it with some serious UV glue. You can still see the crack, but its still a fun piece regardless. The dimensions are roughly 13X15″.

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Richard Parrish Color Theory Workshop

Last Wednesday I finished a color theory fused glass workshop at Helios Kiln Glass Studio. The workshop lasted five days from 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.  The workshop was taught by visiting instructor Richard Parrish from Bozeman, Montana. If you’ve ever seen his work, it is beautifully designed, composed, and executed, which isn’t all too surprising given his being an architect-turned-glass artist.After stopping by the studio last year when he was teaching this same class I came to the conclusion that I had to take it: not only as a general refresher in color theory, but also to better understand how different colored opaque, transparent, and tinted glass interact with one another. (F.Y.I. glass does not mix like paint and can and probably will do weird things if you haven’t experimented enough to know what to expect).The workshop was fun and it was equally involved and labor intensive. I also didn’t realize just how physically and mentally exhausting it could be to stare at bright colors for hours at a time. We had several assignments to complete every day and had access to every color of BullsEye glass, with a few restrictions (no black or white).

We had a great group of people (there were 8 students, including myself) and we all learned as much from each other as we did the instructor. The point wasn’t to make an awesome finished cold-worked piece, but rather learn as much about color interaction as possible. These pictures are of the larger tiles I did after doing numerous smaller test tiles.Richard Parrish will be back to teach a design class as well. I am definitely looking forward to it!